Posts tagged bach to business
Unintended Consequences of Business Policies

Sometimes, policies also can backfire and create unintended consequences. For instance, in 2014, the Maryland legislature outlawed the sale of high-proof alcohol, only to find out that it had an impact on the violin repair business.

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Business Dissolution–Severing Ties Without Fighting to the Death

Business relationships sometimes need “divorces.” This may occur for several reasons. There can be misconduct by a partner or a falling out among partners. Other times, an owner may want to retire, or the business model may no longer make sense.

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Don’t Leave Your Business Entity in a Taxi!

It’s understandable how someone might leave a shopping bag or a small item like keys or a wallet in a taxi. However, in 2008, violinist Phillip Quint left his multi-million dollar Stradivari in a New York City taxi. The taxi driver discovered the instrument and returned it. Like musicians, business owners sometimes forget important tasks relating to their business entities. Although some forgotten tasks may be correctable, others are not. By forgetting to pay attention to their business entities, an owner can lose it forever.

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Backdating–When is it Appropriate?

Our son is the fourth generation to play a violin made in the early 20th century by Prague luthier Janek (John) Juzek. When researching Juzek’s history, I found it interesting to read that he backdated the labels in his instruments. They included his own name but a completion date about five years earlier than the actual date the instrument was completed. Backdating violin labels was not uncommon, and it was not illegal. However, backdating legal documents is another matter. Backdating legal documents is frequently permissible. However, under other circumstances, it can be fraudulent or illegal.

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You Won’t Live Forever, but Your Business May

Johann Sebastian Bach served in the courts of the nobility and for the church in Leipzig. He wrote his music to meet the needs of those who hired him. Little of his music was published during his lifetime, and he likely had little expectation that his music would survive him. Unlike Bach, most business owners expect that their businesses will survive them. Careful business succession planning can make the difference between a business becoming multi-generational family operation and failing after becoming mired in in-fighting or disputes among heirs.

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Low-Tech Data Protection is Important Too!

Recently, a Canadian Court awarded aspiring professional clarinetist Eric Abramovitz a six-figure judgment in an identity theft lawsuit he brought against his ex-girlfriend, after she accessed his e-mail and turned down a coveted scholarship on his behalf. While much of the recent news has been dominated by tales of sophisticated cyber attacks, this anecdote shows that low-tech approaches can be just as damaging. A good data protection plan will evaluate risks specific to the business and establish protocols designed to minimize data compromise and loss, including loss from human error and environmental factors.

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Cybersecurity and Identity Theft–Sometimes it Really Is a Stradivari Violin

Huguette Clark died at the age of 104 in a hospital under a pseudonym, divorced, childless, and a recluse, belying her background. Three years after her death. While cleaning out a closet in one of Huguette’s New York City apartments, someone found a violin bearing the Stradivari label tucked away, untouched for more than 25 years. Reading about Huguette and the one-in-a-million real Strad, I recalled a recent experience in my own life. I received a telephone message no one wants–my bank manager was calling. She said it was important and I should call her as soon as possible.

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Severability Clauses: To Sever, Modify, or Invalidate?

It has been almost half of a century since I first picked up a violin. Yet, I recently started violin lessons again. I realized that I needed to adjust my basic technique–including how I hold the violin. Like small changes in violin technique can create noticeable changes in a performance, overlooked contract provisions can change the meaning of the contract or harm the contracting parties. This article is one of several discussing contract “boilerplate” provisions and why those provisions are important. In this article, we will explore severability clauses.

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Recitals

One month after my son started Suzuki violin at the age of three, I was surprised when his teacher said that he would be performing in a recital. He had barely learned to hold the violin and hadn’t yet played any notes. Contracts also have recitals. Although contracts don’t perform music, their recitals are up front and center, toward the beginning of the contract.

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Read Your Concert Program Booklet and Your Boilerplate Notice Provisions

Concertgoers typically receive a program as they enter the concert hall. Frequently, orchestras include several concerts in a single printed program, so the programs are small booklets, rather than just a couple of sheets of folded paper. These booklets contain the music program, information about guest performers, an orchestra roster, music notes about the compositions being performed. After a quick glance at the evening’s program, it can be easy to ignore the rest of the booklet as unimportant or routine. Boilerplate in contracts is like those concert program booklets. Contracting parties may view them as repetitive and unimportant. This article is one of several discussing contract “boilerplate” provisions and why those provisions are important.

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