Posts tagged Elizabeth A Whitman
Rent Control–Coming to a State Near You?

New York and other major metropolitan areas have had rent control laws for decades. Now some state legislatures are taking more control over the landlord-tenant relationship by passing state-wide rent control laws.

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Contractual "Truncation"or Shortening of Statutes of Limitation

Contractually shortened statutes of limitations are becoming more popular in real estate contracts to provide certainty and finality for the parties.

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Equal Pay–Are All Woodwinds the Same?

As women climb the corporate ladder, there are fewer identical positions they can use to compare their salaries with those received by male colleagues. When positions aren’t the same, there sometimes may be legitimate business reasons unrelated to employee sex for a pay differential. Unfortunately, the limited number of comparable jobs also can make it easier for an employer to engage in pay discrimination.

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How Struggling Orchestras are Like Qualified Opportunity Zone Funds

On July 15, 2019, SEC and NAASA recently released a Joint Summary of securities law concerns for Qualified Opportunity Zone Funds. Although these funds can provide significant tax benefits, fund sponsors must be careful to comply with securities laws when selling them to investors.

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A Concert Hall for Every Ensemble and an Apartment for Every Family

It has been more than thirty years since Congress added familial status to the classes of individuals covered by the Fair Housing Act. Still, many landlords continue to adopt policies which discriminate against tenants with children.

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Instrument Rental Plans and Title Insurance Policy Options

To real estate buyers, title insurance options can be confusing. There is standard and extended coverage, which is limited by exclusions and exceptions. Plus, a buyer can purchase endorsements to provide coverage for specific concerns.

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Wachet Auf and Lis Pendens

Lis pendens puts prospective real estate buyers on notice that the lawsuit is pending. If they take title to the real estate, they do so at their own risk, and the results can be brutal.

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Leaving a String Quartet or Tenant-in-Common Real Estate Investment

Originally in residence at Cleveland Institute of Music, the Cleveland Quartet moved together as a quartet to State University of University of New York at Buffalo and then to Eastman School of Music. During the quartet’s history, some musicians left the quartet and were replaced.  But in 1995, the quartet decided to disband. Years of international travel had taken their toll, and the musicians wanted to pursue other interests including, teaching and orchestral work. Real estate co-owners may make similar decisions to change investments or terminate their relationship.

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Surviving Mahler Symphonies and Contract Terminations

At 90 minutes in length, Mahler’s Sixth is a true endurance piece. Consisting of four movements. Performance of a symphony of that length typically leaves orchestra musicians and conductors dripping in sweat as if they had just finished the New York Marathon, rather than played in the New York Philharmonic. Although surviving a symphonic performance or running a marathon frequently is synonymous with accomplishing a huge feat, survival has a different meaning in contracts.

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Unfinished Music and “Unfinished” Contracts 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Franz Schubert both died in Vienna while still in their thirties. Each left an unfinished work which has become a staple in the classical music repertoire. Likewise, contracting parties may leave contracts incomplete or "unfinished."

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