Posts tagged Orchestrating Real Estate
How Struggling Orchestras are Like Qualified Opportunity Zone Funds

On July 15, 2019, SEC and NAASA recently released a Joint Summary of securities law concerns for Qualified Opportunity Zone Funds. Although these funds can provide significant tax benefits, fund sponsors must be careful to comply with securities laws when selling them to investors.

Read More
A Concert Hall for Every Ensemble and an Apartment for Every Family

It has been more than thirty years since Congress added familial status to the classes of individuals covered by the Fair Housing Act. Still, many landlords continue to adopt policies which discriminate against tenants with children.

Read More
Wachet Auf and Lis Pendens

Lis pendens puts prospective real estate buyers on notice that the lawsuit is pending. If they take title to the real estate, they do so at their own risk, and the results can be brutal.

Read More
Leaving a String Quartet or Tenant-in-Common Real Estate Investment

Originally in residence at Cleveland Institute of Music, the Cleveland Quartet moved together as a quartet to State University of University of New York at Buffalo and then to Eastman School of Music. During the quartet’s history, some musicians left the quartet and were replaced.  But in 1995, the quartet decided to disband. Years of international travel had taken their toll, and the musicians wanted to pursue other interests including, teaching and orchestral work. Real estate co-owners may make similar decisions to change investments or terminate their relationship.

Read More
Surviving Mahler Symphonies and Contract Terminations

At 90 minutes in length, Mahler’s Sixth is a true endurance piece. Consisting of four movements. Performance of a symphony of that length typically leaves orchestra musicians and conductors dripping in sweat as if they had just finished the New York Marathon, rather than played in the New York Philharmonic. Although surviving a symphonic performance or running a marathon frequently is synonymous with accomplishing a huge feat, survival has a different meaning in contracts.

Read More
A Bill of Sale and Proving Violin Ownership

In the 1960's, Genevieve Veder donated the Duke of Alcantra Strad to UCLA, which loaned the valuable instrument to violinist David Margetts, who lost it. When the instrument surfaced 27 years later,  another violinist claimed that she was the rightful owner because UCLA did not have complete documentation showing its ownership. Documentation showing change of ownership is equally important in real estate transactions. 

Read More
Fermatas, Grand Pauses, and Alternatives to Holdbacks in Real Estate Transactions

Fermatas and grand pauses are alternatives a composer can use slow down the pace of the music when the changes to tempowon't create the desired effect. In a real estate transaction, sometimes, the parties’ circumstances don't allow for a holdback, and the parties are forced to look for alternatives.

Read More
How Holdbacks Affect Music and Real Estate Transactions

There are four music terms describing a holding back of tempo, each having its own nuanced meaning. Similarly, there are different holdback strategies in real estate transactions, which parties should tailor to the needs of their transaction.

Read More
Be Aware of Legal Issues When You “Drone” On Someone Else’s Property

Drone is a musical term which refers to a single note (or notes) which is played continuously throughout a piece of music. A drone note also can be used as a music education tool to help with intonation. Another type of drone, which does not involve music, has also been in the news. From package delivery, to search and rescue operations , to real estate inspections , unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, also called drones, have become mainstream.

Read More