A Bill of Sale and Proving Violin Ownership 

In the 1960's, Genevieve Veder donated the Duke of Alcantra Strad to UCLA, which loaned the valuable instrument to violinist David Margetts, who lost it. When the instrument surfaced 27 years later,  another violinist claimed that she was the rightful owner because UCLA did not have complete documentation showing its ownership. Documentation showing change of ownership is equally important in real estate transactions. 

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Fermatas, Grand Pauses, and Alternatives to Holdbacks in Real Estate Transactions

Fermatas and grand pauses are alternatives a composer can use slow down the pace of the music when the changes to tempowon't create the desired effect. In a real estate transaction, sometimes, the parties’ circumstances don't allow for a holdback, and the parties are forced to look for alternatives.

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How Holdbacks Affect Music and Real Estate Transactions

There are four music terms describing a holding back of tempo, each having its own nuanced meaning. Similarly, there are different holdback strategies in real estate transactions, which parties should tailor to the needs of their transaction.

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A Modern-Day Beethoven and Government Impersonation Scams

Beginning in the late 20th century, the musical world was captivated by Mamoru Samuragochi, a deaf man who, like Beethoven, composed classical music. Audiences from Japan to New York celebrated his soulful music and flamboyant style. His music was so spectacular that he was celebrated as “Japan’s Beethoven.” 

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Knowing When to Leave Your Business Behind

The Lark Quartet recently announced that after 34 years, it would disband at the end of its 2018/19 season. Business owners similarly may decide to sell, transfer, or close their businesses. Business owners, also, have different goals and motivations for these decisions. 

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Don’t Leave Your Business Entity in a Taxi!

It’s understandable how someone might leave a shopping bag or a small item like keys or a wallet in a taxi. However, in 2008, violinist Phillip Quint left his multi-million dollar Stradivari in a New York City taxi. The taxi driver discovered the instrument and returned it. Like musicians, business owners sometimes forget important tasks relating to their business entities. Although some forgotten tasks may be correctable, others are not. By forgetting to pay attention to their business entities, an owner can lose it forever.

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Backdating–When is it Appropriate?

Our son is the fourth generation to play a violin made in the early 20th century by Prague luthier Janek (John) Juzek. When researching Juzek’s history, I found it interesting to read that he backdated the labels in his instruments. They included his own name but a completion date about five years earlier than the actual date the instrument was completed. Backdating violin labels was not uncommon, and it was not illegal. However, backdating legal documents is another matter. Backdating legal documents is frequently permissible. However, under other circumstances, it can be fraudulent or illegal.

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Is Your Letter of Intent Permanent and Binding?

Violins are made from about 70 different pieces of woods, most of which are carefully carved and glued together. Despite the availability of synthetic glues, it is not used on the finer instruments. Fine instruments are glued together with water soluble glue made from animal skin and tendon. Although “hide glue,” as it is known, is strong and serves the purpose of holding the violin together, it is not supposed to be permanent. Letters of intent and term sheets are like hide glue. They are meant to provide a strong framework for a transaction and to serve as an aid in negotiating a final contract. However, they are not intended to be permanent and binding.

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