The Art of Legal Drafting

The study of law in the U.S. is treated more as a science than as an art. Law school requires that students learn hundreds of legal concepts, much as a musician would learn mechanically how to play an instrument. A good amount of the study of law involves memorization of rules – court rules, equitable maxims, statutes, and regulations.

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An A Isn't the Same for Everyone — Why Regulation A+ Might be a B or C for Real Estate Funds

In 2015, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) adopted what has become known as Regulation A+. Like transposing instruments, Regulation A+ was designed to make it easier for small businesses to raise new capital. Yet, just as an A played on alto clarinet sounds like a G, Regulation A+ doesn’t provide an A+ solution for all businesses or issuers.

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Preparing Your Business for the New Year—Do You Have Extra Tubas?

After stealing more than 30 tubas and sousaphones from schools during winter break, the thieves didn't hold onto the instruments for long. They found demand for used tubas among banda performers. However, business owners may find it more difficult to unload their heavy baggage as they move into the new year.

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Recognizing Tax Collection Scams

A few weeks ago, I received a voicemail on my cell phone from someone who said he was with the IRS. He claimed I owed past due taxes and that I needed to call back immediately to prevent criminal prosecution for tax evasion. Fortunately, I recognized the call as a common tax collection scam.

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Signature Blocks and How They Affect Contract Validity

Many people do not pay attention to signature blocks or how a contract is signed. The signature may not match the signature block or the signature block, itself may not be correct. Sometimes, parties never assemble a fully-signed contract and are at a loss when the contract must be produced in a dispute.

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A Bill of Sale and Proving Violin Ownership

In the 1960's, Genevieve Veder donated the Duke of Alcantra Strad to UCLA, which loaned the valuable instrument to violinist David Margetts, who lost it. When the instrument surfaced 27 years later,  another violinist claimed that she was the rightful owner because UCLA did not have complete documentation showing its ownership. Documentation showing change of ownership is equally important in real estate transactions. 

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Fermatas, Grand Pauses, and Alternatives to Holdbacks in Real Estate Transactions

Fermatas and grand pauses are alternatives a composer can use slow down the pace of the music when the changes to tempowon't create the desired effect. In a real estate transaction, sometimes, the parties’ circumstances don't allow for a holdback, and the parties are forced to look for alternatives.

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How Holdbacks Affect Music and Real Estate Transactions

There are four music terms describing a holding back of tempo, each having its own nuanced meaning. Similarly, there are different holdback strategies in real estate transactions, which parties should tailor to the needs of their transaction.

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